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PMD’s clients have access to an enormous network of visibility, along with ongoing services and skills you won’t find anywhere else.

SERVICES

PMD’s 25-year success story gives you the opportunity to paint on a nation-wide canvas. Our WindowposterTM Displays are seen in the windows and doorways of over 50,000 retailers, cafes, and storefronts.

PMD uses proprietary technology to track your customers, combining state-of-the-art modern tools with traditional advertising in revolutionary new ways.

PMD’s engineers optimize your online & mobile campaign with surgical precision through social media, keyword targeting, native advertising, and more.

A great companion to our WindowPosterTM Displays, Postcard, Brochure, and Booklet Displays are a great way to find customers inside establishments. And our network of 50,000+ storefronts will get your message to countless new customers.

PMD has over 20 years of ad design experience. Our design experts will closely evaluate your work and disclose tips for optimization.

We’ll work with you to create the best, most cost-effective physical media for your campaign. And we’ll ship it to you for free.

PMD provides an unprecedented level of reporting, from in-depth web analytics to Interactive Venue Mapping with on-site photographs.

PMD’s impression data is completely unparalleled. Our traffic flow analysis will show you exactly how many impressions, and potential customers, your campaign will generate.

BE SEEN in more than 25 Cities and 500 Neighborhoods

PMD Windowposter™, Postcard & Brochure Displays are seen in 500+ neighborhoods in more than 25 major U.S. markets. More than 50,000 independent cafes, restaurants, retailers, and storefronts make up our Nationwide Advertising Display Network, one of the largest of its kind in the U.S.

LATEST BLOG POSTS

POST NO BILLS: NEW YORK’S CLOSED ICONIC VENUES

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Earlier this fall, we spent some time thinking about the alarming vacancy rate amongst retail storefronts in New York City. We were shocked at the volume of responses our post inspired: friends from across the country contacted us to express their anger at the difficulties faced by small businesses even in prosperous, cosmopolitan cities. This week, we’re happy to look at these vacancies in a different light: through the lens of art.

If you haven’t heard, we’ve developed a reputation for being pretty poster-obsessed. When we read about Poster House, a museum dedicated to the media we so adore, we couldn’t wait to check out their collection of vintage poster advertisements.

Though Poster House doesn’t officially open it’s doors to the public until early 2019, the museum’s staff organized a pop-up show, “Gone Tomorrow”, to honor New York’s iconic, now-defunct venues – and the posters used by local promoters to advertise the parties, “happenings”, and other events that occurred in these long-shuttered hot spots.

The exhibit features over one hundred posters and handbills, each providing a window into a particular moment in New York history.

PosterAdvertising
Upon entering the gallery (housed in the former Tekserve space on W. 23rd Street, itself an out of business New York landmark), visitors find themselves at the southern tip of Manhattan via a conceptual floor map of the city of New York. The posters, displayed on temporary construction barriers spray-painted with “Post No Bills”, are arranged within the space according the general geographic location of the venue they advertise.

Featuring a mixture of well-known classics and one-off DIY works, the show highlights the democratic nature of poster art. Posters are at their very core a form of advertising: as a media that’s intended to sell, posters don’t necessarily receive their due in terms of artistic and cultural relevance. But because the nature of poster advertising is ephemeral – that is, poster advertisements go up and come down according to the needs of the campaign – the displays which survive their first life as an ad live on as snapshots of the past. 

While some nightclubs highlighted in “Gone Tomorrow” – like The Bottom Line, recently honored by the Schimmel Center’s “If These Walls Could Talk” show – remain relatively fresh in the city’s collective memory, other venues have faded from the public consciousness.

The impetus for the show, according to curator Angelina Lippert, came from a single display: a movie-poster sized bulletin advertising “Circus of Power” at the Virgin Outlaw Club hosted by one Tommy Gunn. When Lippert couldn’t find details about the nightclub, she found Gunn via Facebook. Gunn was a notorious nightlife promoter in the 80’s and 90’s who started his career with posters: he worked with a printer downtown to produce eye-catching advertisements to drive clubgoers to the parties he threw. As time went on, he developed a keen eye for design and became known for the splashy posters that adorned the sides of NYC buildings. Reminds us of someone else we know!

For one night only last week, Gunn provided guests of the Poster House with an oral history of the venues – the Ritz, the Peppermint Lounge, and Danceteria, among many others – highlighted throughout the show. Though you may have missed the chance to be regaled with stories of vintage NYC, the exhibit is still open to the public via appointment!

 

MUSIC INDUSTRY UPDATE: MAKING A COMEBACK WITH SPOTIFY AND MICHAEL JACKSON

Music Comeback Michael JacksonAfter years of declining sales in the Music Industry worldwide, 2016 marked a turning point. The surprising savior? Streaming services – a technology some once predicted would kill the music business – which now account for 51.4% of U.S. music revenue.
Sales from services like Spotify, Apple Music, and Pandora are so strong that they more than compensated for the continued losses in both digital downloads (down 20.5% in 2016) and physical sales (down 7.6% in 2016).

This incredible growth indicates that even though the way we consume music has changed, the love is still there. The instantaneous nature of streaming services provides new listeners access to generations of music everywhere, as close as the device in your hand.

In order to meet consumer demand, and to entice newer listeners, some record companies are digging into their archives to offer re-mastered hits and previously unreleased tracks packaged in creative formats.

Case in Point: This September, Epic Records dropped SCREAM, an exclusive compilation of Michael Jackson hits, available via both digital download and licensed streaming services. The album itself, a mixture of MJ classics and Jackson Five hits, opens with international DJ Steve Aoki’s Thriller re-mix and features a new mash-up of “Blood on the Dance Floor” and “Dangerous” by electronic duo White Panda.

But SCREAM is more than album: it’s a multi-media collaboration, at once a throwback to Jackson’s heydey and a glimpse into a virtual future. On October 27th, Epic is set to release part two of the project, a collectible, glow-in-the-dark 2LP vinyl packaged with with a poster featuring AR (augmented reality) capabilities enabled by the Shazam app.

Epic and Shazam teamed up to place a limited number of these posters in cities across the U.S., tailoring the AR experience to particular geo-locations. Though mum’s the word on what the experience will ultimately entail, sneak previews released by the label indicate things will be spooky!

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The shift in the way music is monetized dovetails with another trend: younger audiences tend to favor experiential modes of consumption. To capture the attention of millennials, artists and labels are releasing media to complement the instantaneity and immediacy that has made streaming so popular.

Here’s a brief run-down of how other musical clients are connecting with audiences through new and traditional media:

While music videos have long been an industry staple, 360 degree “interactive” videos are a relatively new way for fans to connect with their favorite artists. Live streaming channels also offer fans the opportunity to watch performances as they occur in real time.

The National recently offered both opportunities to fans to promote their latest album, Sleep Well Beast. The band released a 360 teaser interview on the New York Times and a live stream of their Paris concert on Pitchfork.

Though there’s nothing like being present at a studio session or front row at a show, these two virtual experiences hint that artists will continue to develop new and innovative media strategies that bring fans as close to a live set as possible.

And of course, there’s always our favorite media: posters.

To help promote album sales, two of our favorite artists – indie darling Josh Ritter and synth-pop stars Joywave – reached out to PMD Media to drum excitement for tour stops and to boost album sales. By papering the clients’ target DMAs with impactful WindowPoster™ displays, we helped Ritter and Joywave BE SEEN.

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Way back when, PMD Media started with a poster advertising the Grateful Dead performing at Madison Square Garden. Like many of the artists we work with, you might say we have roots in rock and roll

Though we may be moving closer and closer to a digital world, we suspect the classic form of the poster – in all of its adaptability – will persist… not unlike the music industry!


 

VACANT NEW YORK: THE SLOW DEATH OF AN INDEPENDENT CITY

The last few years bear witness to the continued good economic fortune of New York: from the well-tended foliage at Madison Square Park to the throngs of tourists visiting the Williamsburg waterfront, the city remains not only a destination for culture, but for consumption.

So why, then, are the traditional retail corridors blighted with empty storefronts and red “FOR RENT” signs?

Economist Tim Wu, in a 2015 New Yorker article, speculates that many of these unfilled vacancies can be attributed to landlord greed: why lease your space to a mom-and-pop shop when you can hold out for the big bucks corporate retailers – like Duane Reade and Citi Bank – are willing to pay?

This tendency seems to be exacerbated in areas with landlords who hold mini-monopolies: dropping the price on a single storefront may cause the prices on nearby locations to fall. As Wu notes, “That suggests waiting for Marc Jacobs instead of renting to Jane Jacobs”.

That remark proved uncanny: In May of 2017, New York State Senator Brad Hoylman released a special report entitled Bleaker on Bleecker: A Snapshot of High-Rent Blight in Greenwich Village and Chelsea. The report detailed the unusually high retail vacancy rates along Bleecker Street between 6th and 8th Avenues: 18.44% of retail spaces (or 26 of 141 shops) were vacant in the spring of 2017.

Vacant Storefront

Film Center Cafe, 9th Avenue, NY (1933-2011)

Hoylman’s figure is astonishingly high (The New York Times cites 5% as the standard commercial vacancy rate associated with middle-class metropolitan areas) – and is even more extraordinary given the neighborhood’s reputation as a high-end retail destination. It seems that even Marc Jacobs has priced himself out – in the past two years, the company has shuttered five of its six retail locations along Bleecker.

Though Jacob’s team remains quiet on the brand’s exit from the neighborhood, the turnover rate of merchants is high, a symptom of what Wu termed “high-rent blight”, a phenomenon unique to upscale (and rapidly gentrifying) neighborhoods. On Curbed, writer Emily Nonko summed up the situation nicely: “High-end companies pushed out longtime, diverse businesses that called Bleecker Street home, and when the newcomers couldn’t get enough traffic to justify the sky-high rents, they shuttered and left the block empty”.

Unfortunately, this affliction has spread throughout the city.  In early June, Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer announced that Broadway, historically a prime retail corridor, currently features 188 empty and/or vacant storefronts. Fifth Avenue, another destination for high-end fashions and furnishings, saw vacancy rates increase year over year: according to real estate firm Cushman & Wakefield,  the vacancy rate for 5th Avenue between 49th and 60th Street was 17.4% in the first quarter of 2017; the stretch of 5th Avenue between 42nd and 49th boasted a vacancy rate of 32.8%.

These vacancies are pervasive enough to inspire Vacant New York, a website run by one man intent on mapping all available storefronts in the city.

So why does this matter?

It’s discouraging to see beloved neighborhood establishments shutter their doors, only to be replaced by corporate chains. This erosion of local character makes the city less vibrant and diverse… and now that we’ve reached the point that the chains have priced themselves out, it’s time to reevaluate the way we approach local businesses.

Independently owned stores, cafes, salons and other small businesses are PMD’s business. We exist because our clients get SEEN in these windows; our outdoor advertising network is comprised of these same indie storefronts.

When our network partners move, close, or just disappear, we notice. And you should, too! Small businesses attract foot traffic, create jobs, and bolster neighborhood economies: 68% of money spent at independent businesses is funneled back into the local economy, compared to only 43% via big box chain stores. Most of all, they foster a sense of place and community – an invaluable service that neither Starbucks nor CVS can provide.

 

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