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PMD’s clients have access to an enormous network of visibility, along with ongoing services and skills you won’t find anywhere else.

SERVICES

PMD’s 25-year success story gives you the opportunity to paint on a nation-wide canvas. Our WindowposterTM Displays are seen in the windows and doorways of over 50,000 retailers, cafes, and storefronts.

PMD uses proprietary technology to track your customers, combining state-of-the-art modern tools with traditional advertising in revolutionary new ways.

PMD’s engineers optimize your online & mobile campaign with surgical precision through social media, keyword targeting, native advertising, and more.

A great companion to our WindowPosterTM Displays, Postcard, Brochure, and Booklet Displays are a great way to find customers inside establishments. And our network of 50,000+ storefronts will get your message to countless new customers.

PMD has over 20 years of ad design experience. Our design experts will closely evaluate your work and disclose tips for optimization.

We’ll work with you to create the best, most cost-effective physical media for your campaign. And we’ll ship it to you for free.

PMD provides an unprecedented level of reporting, from in-depth web analytics to Interactive Venue Mapping with on-site photographs.

PMD’s impression data is completely unparalleled. Our traffic flow analysis will show you exactly how many impressions, and potential customers, your campaign will generate.

BE SEEN in more than 25 Cities and 500 Neighborhoods

PMD Windowposter™, Postcard & Brochure Displays are seen in 500+ neighborhoods in more than 25 major U.S. markets. More than 50,000 independent cafes, restaurants, retailers, and storefronts make up our Nationwide Advertising Display Network, one of the largest of its kind in the U.S.

LATEST BLOG POSTS

MAKE THIS SEASON WARM & WONDERFUL FOR THOSE LESS FORTUNATE

Poster Advertising Wildpostings Nonprofit

Every night, 62,000 New Yorkers sleep in a shelter. Over one third – 23,000 – are children. With just a simple gesture, YOU can keep them warm.

This winter, PMD Media has teamed up with New York Cares to promote their 29th Annual Coat Drive. Over almost three decades, New York Cares has collected nearly 2 million coats. We’d like to make this year their most successful yet.

There are a few ways for you to help – and most of them don’t cost a cent. 

And for those of you not in New Yorkkeep reading – we’ve got you covered as well!

If you’re breaking in a new jacket or parka, please consider dropping off one of your older, gently loved coats at the many designated donation locations, all handily mapped out here.

Still sporting your trusty winter wear? With a quick text message, you can provide a coat to someone in need – just text “COAT” to 41444. Your $20 donation will furnish a NY neighbor with high-quality, warm outwear to get through the coldest months of the year.

Finally, the easiest way to participate is to spread the word! Tweet, Share, and Post about the Coat Drive across platforms using the hashtag #CoatDrive.

Not in New York? We’ve posted a list of coat drives occurring across the country. And for those of you lucky enough to enjoy sunny weather year-round, please consider organizations supporting ongoing relief efforts for Florida, Texas, and Puerto Rico, collected below.

 

Non-NYC Coat Drives:

One Warm Coat (Nationwide)

Salvation Army – Chicago Bears – Jewel Osco (Chicago and Denver)

NBC – Telemundo (Chicago)

Jersey Cares (New Jersey)

 

General Giving Opportunities:

Hispanic Federation (Puerto Rico Hurricane Relief)

Unicef Emergency Relief (Hurricane and other disaster relief)

Charity:Water (worldwide clean drinking water)

 

And here are some tips if you’re looking to making the holidays special for little ones:

9 Ways to Donate a Gift to a Child in Need This Season

 

 

POST NO BILLS: NEW YORK’S CLOSED ICONIC VENUES

poster advertising wildpostings

Earlier this fall, we spent some time thinking about the alarming vacancy rate amongst retail storefronts in New York City. We were shocked at the volume of responses our post inspired: friends from across the country contacted us to express their anger at the difficulties faced by small businesses even in prosperous, cosmopolitan cities. This week, we’re happy to look at these vacancies in a different light: through the lens of art.

If you haven’t heard, we’ve developed a reputation for being pretty poster-obsessed. When we read about Poster House, a museum dedicated to the media we so adore, we couldn’t wait to check out their collection of vintage poster advertisements.

Though Poster House doesn’t officially open it’s doors to the public until early 2019, the museum’s staff organized a pop-up show, “Gone Tomorrow”, to honor New York’s iconic, now-defunct venues – and the posters used by local promoters to advertise the parties, “happenings”, and other events that occurred in these long-shuttered hot spots.

The exhibit features over one hundred posters and handbills, each providing a window into a particular moment in New York history.

Poster Advertising Wildposting
Upon entering the gallery (housed in the former Tekserve space on W. 23rd Street, itself an out of business New York landmark), visitors find themselves at the southern tip of Manhattan via a conceptual floor map of the city of New York. The posters, displayed on temporary construction barriers spray-painted with “Post No Bills”, are arranged within the space according the general geographic location of the venue they advertise.

Featuring a mixture of well-known classics and one-off DIY works, the show highlights the democratic nature of poster art. Posters are at their very core a form of advertising: as a media that’s intended to sell, posters don’t necessarily receive their due in terms of artistic and cultural relevance. But because the nature of poster advertising is ephemeral – that is, poster advertisements go up and come down according to the needs of the campaign – the displays which survive their first life as an ad live on as snapshots of the past. 

While some nightclubs highlighted in “Gone Tomorrow” – like The Bottom Line, recently honored by the Schimmel Center’s “If These Walls Could Talk” show – remain relatively fresh in the city’s collective memory, other venues have faded from the public consciousness.

The impetus for the show, according to curator Angelina Lippert, came from a single display: a movie-poster sized bulletin advertising “Circus of Power” at the Virgin Outlaw Club hosted by one Tommy Gunn. When Lippert couldn’t find details about the nightclub, she found Gunn via Facebook. Gunn was a notorious nightlife promoter in the 80’s and 90’s who started his career with posters: he worked with a printer downtown to produce eye-catching advertisements to drive clubgoers to the parties he threw. As time went on, he developed a keen eye for design and became known for the splashy posters that adorned the sides of NYC buildings. Reminds us of someone else we know!

For one night only last week, Gunn provided guests of the Poster House with an oral history of the venues – the Ritz, the Peppermint Lounge, and Danceteria, among many others – highlighted throughout the show. Though you may have missed the chance to be regaled with stories of vintage NYC, the exhibit is still open to the public via appointment!

 

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